Apart from certain fixed points, such as Giacometti and Jorn, the vitality of the Louisiana Collection is ensured by showcasing it in installations and presentations that vary in size as well as theme. This page gives you an overview of what is currently on view.

HUMOUR TO START WITH

Hans Peter Feldmann og Sophie Calle

You enter the museum via the old villa and its classical en suite rooms overlooking the garden. Currently you see here some of German artist Hans-Peter Feldmann's witty and simple modifications of old-school paintings, that he buys at sales.

In so doing Feldmann (born 1941) helps to set the images free – in the sense of free of history, free of social context, free of the cult surrounding authorship and creation, and perhaps also free of the restrictive authority that the museums can constitute.

Sophie Calle (born 1953) is a French conceptual artist whose works feature ideas and language as much as actual images. In 'Where and When? Berck', shown here, text and images intertwine.

Pictures and words seem to play tricks on us. Clued in by the artist, we experience meaningful coincidences sparking symbolic imagery. But does this happen inside or outside the artwork? Are the texts fictions contrived by the artist? Calle always leaves us guessing.

GERMAINE RICHIER

In the North Wing, connecting the Giacometti and Jorn Galleries, we are confronted with works by French sculptor Germaine Richier (1902-1959). She is regards as a highly original link between her teacher Antoine Bourdelle and her colleague Alberto Giacometti. Whereas her early works are distinctly realistic, later on the Surrealist fascination with hybrids of humans and nature is evident.

Richier’s art puts a focus on the material. The artist takes from nature and gives back to nature. Also the human as nature, held together by tissue and branches. Alongside works by Giacometti and Louise Bourgeois, Richier’s figures in the Louisiana’s collection are a key chapter in the story of the human body as an existential statement from the postwar era onwards.