Richard Prince

17.11.22 - 5.3.23

A cool and central figure of American ‘New Picture Generation’, Richard Prince often uses banal images from our entertainment and consumption culture, which he twists and transforms in a way where the ordinary is "uplifted" into something both strange and seductive.

Shown in the series Louisiana on Paper, supported by C.L. Davids Fond og Samling

Richard Prince (b. 1949) stands as a cool and central figure in what was named ‘The New Picture Generation’ in the US around 1980. Here a new generation of artists emerged in opposition to the image-denying tendencies of the 1970s, with Jeff Koons as an exponent who would gain widespread fame. With his more subtle and understated approach, Richard Prince, on the other hand, has in many ways remained an artist’s artist – highly admired by e.g. Arthur Jafa and Alex Da Corte.

In his work, Prince highlights the marginal and banal aspects of society: jokes, photographs, advertisements, idol worship and other forms of “everyday cult”. He manages to identify and sample visual codes and finely tune them so that they become seductive and strange despite their banality.

Richard Prince (b. 1949) has an expert eye for how grand themes imperceptibly seep into and out of everything that surrounds us – relations in the workplace and
between generations, the present vis-à-vis mythical time and more. Delving into the collective unconscious, British writer J. G. Ballard’s description of “normality as the
next special effect” in Prince’s art holds true. His art has a singularly odd glow, both sexy and baroque.